News

Join us in Augusta for our 2018 Labor Lobby Day at the State House!

Tuesday, March 13th - 7:45 am registration, 8 am training begins 

A bill in Augusta would pave the way for driverless buses in Maine. Needless to say, bus drivers have big concerns.

Health care workers at Hospice of Southern Maine voted to come together as a union in May.  

Last week the German metalworkers’ union, IG Metall, arguably one of the world’s most powerful unions, showed that unions have the power to shape their future workplaces.  

IG Metall negotiated a precedent-setting collective-bargaining agreement that privileges working conditions over wages. It won its key demand that workers have the right to reduce their working week from 35 to 28 hours for a period of up to two years in order to care for family members.

Organized labor finally got its chance to be heard in the debate about how Connecticut can do a better job competing for business and improving its crisis-prone state finances.

Bangor nurse Amy Lee Tidd, a member of Maine State Nurses Association, recently returned from a medical relief trip to Puerto Rico.

Along side union members from across the United States, Amy Lee brought medical care to thousands of Puerto Ricans who were effected by the devestating Hurricane Maria. Travel conditions were difficult and resources scarce. 

In November, technicians at Maine Coast Memorial Hospital voted to form a union. 

These workers voted nearly unanimously to come together as a union, and to affiliate with the Maine State Nurses Assoication, National Nurses United. 

They join the RNs at Maine Coast who are also represented by MSNA. 

Welcome to the labor movement, brothers and sisters!

When news broke that Senator Susan Collins had voted for the horrible GOP tax scam that gives millions of dollars to the wealthiest on the backs of the working class, local union members felt compelled to respond.

Following a rally outside her Bangor office, four union members and a disabled veteran went upstairs to speak with the Senators' staff.  Given their inadequate answers as to why Collins voted to sell out the working families of Maine, they decided not to leave until she pledged to oppose it on the next vote.