Maine AFL-CIO

 

IN THIS EDITION:

  • Organizing Wave Continues — Biddeford Saco O.O.B. Transit Workers Form Union
  • Machinist Member Doug Hall Kicks Off PRO Act Tour Across Maine
  • Maine Med Nurses Have Formed a Union - Now the Hard Work Begins
  • The PRO-Labor Legislative Round-up
  • Maine Service Employees Association Hiring for Field Rep
  • When Maine Workers Launched the First Independent Labor Media Outlets

Thirty two transit drivers, mechanics and other staff at Biddeford Saco Old Orchard Beach Transit (BSOOB Transit) have formed a union with the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 714 and will soon be negotiating their first contract.

“Drivers here are woefully underpaid and that was one of the main reasons for workers wanting to organize a union,” said ATU member Joe Gaudette, who is a part-time BSOOB Transit driver. “Now that we’re officially a union we urge BSOOB Transit to work with us to reach a fair contract that appropriately compensates employees for the valuable service we provide to the community.”

BSOOB Transit is the primary provider of public transportation in the Biddeford, Saco and Old Orchard Beach region with express commuter bus service that connects the Tri-Town area to downtown Portland and seasonal trolleys that serve tourist destinations in the area. ATU 714 also represents transit workers at the Community Connector in Bangor, the Greater Portland Metro bus line and the Regional Transportation Program in Portland. The successful union election comes on the heals of two major union election victories at Portland Museum of Art and Maine Medical Center.

IN THIS EDITION:

  • New Hampshire Labor Movement Defeats Right to Work for Less Bill!
  • Consolidated Communications Workers in Tough Contract Negotiations
  • The Labor Legislative Round-Up
  • Mainers for Tax Fairness Rally - Tuesday, June 8
  • Machinists’ Union Hold Guide Dogs Golf Tournament Benefit
  • A 12-Minute Musical History of Maine Labor Struggles

IN THIS EDITION:

  • From Iraq to Maine: An Interview with USW 366 Unit President, Anaam Jabbir
  • Union Business Spotlight: Xtreme Screen Printing
  • Governor Mills’ Change Package Fully Funds Education and Revenue Sharing
  • Bill to Improve Unemployment System Clears Committee
  • Committee Passes Bill to Protect Whistleblowers
  • Maine AFL-CIO Gives Race & Labor Presentation to Legislative Committee

IN THIS EDITION

  • Tell Governor Mills to End the Pay Gap for State Employees
  • Want to Have Us Do a PRO Act Presentation at Your Next Union Meeting?
  • President Phinney to Discuss Unions & Democracy on WERU FM
  • Maine AFL-CIO Backs Bill to Require Public Employers to Bargain in Good Faith
  • Pro-Labor Legislation Moving Forward
  • The Making of Maine’s Working Class

Recent News

The core principle of organized labor in America has always been a commitment to fairness and opportunity for all working people — it’s why collective bargaining agreements have long included robust and durable protections that reflect a commitment not only to union members, but to the common good of all our communities and the people who live and work in them.

The Rural Electrification Act was signed into law 85 years ago this month. It was a visionary infrastructure program for the 20th century, the centerpiece of a federal energy investment strategy that brought growth and prosperity to the South, the West, and across rural America. Because of these investments, generations of Americans were wealthier, healthier and led better lives.

Today’s energy infrastructure challenges are no less daunting. We must invest quickly and decisively to reduce emissions and stem climate change, and to improve our lagging competitiveness. New infrastructure must also deliver results on social equity, inequality, and systemic racism, 21st century crises whose solutions cannot be deferred.

In 2020, Union Plus was able to give more than $2 million in hardship help to union members, plus some end-of-year gifts for extraordinary union members who were nominated by their communities. One hardship grant recipient was Beau Bittner. Bittner, a member of the UAW, worked on the line at an automaker factory in Louisville, Kentucky, performing torque inspections and ensuring the quality of big-name trucks and SUVs. He comes from a long line of union members and is heavily involved in his UAW local union.

Take Action

Two pieces of legislation will take an important step toward fixing our unjust immigration system by providing permanent protections to vital members of our communities and our unions. Call your senators and urge them to support the Dream Act (S. 264) and the SECURE Act (S. 306) today.

The American Families Plan will make it easier for working people to care for our loved ones. It invests and builds better infrastructure for child care, education and paid leave.

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