News

IN THIS EDITION:

  • Google Workers Organize with CWA 1400
  • Union Members Meet with Congregational Delegation on New COVID Relief Bill
  • Register Now for Maine AFL-CIO State Legislative Conference - Feb. 26
  • Learn How Maine’s Earned Paid Time Off Law Impacts Collective Bargaining - Feb. 3
  • Register Now for Medicare for All Strategy Conference

This year, due to the pandemic, we have cancelled our in-person Labor Lobby Day activities at the State House, but we will be holding a virtual 2020 Legislative Policy Forum for union members to le

IN THIS EDITION:

  • Labor Reading Group to Feature Author Bill Fletcher, Jr. — Jan. 28th
  • Union Members Deliver Nearly 10 Tons of Food to Mainers in Need
  • New Book Chronicles Worker Militancy in Maine’s Paper Industry
  • Kittery Water District Workers Ratify First Contract
  • Join Virtual Events Celebrating the Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • MSEA-SEIU 1989 Hiring for a Union Organizer Position

The GOP Trump administration’s massive job safety and health deregulation and its lack of enforcement have worsened the toll of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S., the AFL-CIO says. In a Zoom press conference on Death On The Job 2020, the federation’s 29th annual report on job safety and health, federation President Richard Trumka blamed GOP Oval Office occupant Donald Trump for that. He said Trump left “millions vulnerable to infection, and in far too many cases, death.”

The complaint is another sign of the frustration over the treatment of workers under the Trump administration, and it places the United States in the realm of potential wrongdoing typically occupied by less-developed and less-democratic countries. “Covid has laid bare what we already knew,” Richard Trumka, the president of the AFL-CIO said in an interview. “It has demonstrated that not only is the U.S. violating workers’ rights, but those violations are resulting in people dying. It became so outrageous that we wanted to file a complaint.”

IN THIS EDITION

  • UNION BUSTING ALERT! Support Portland Museum of Art (PMA) Workers
  • Firefighters Form Group to Advocate for Women’s Issues
  • Laborers Local 327 Seeking Experienced Workers
  • Dick Rogers Retires as Business Manager of IBEW 1837

When the Supreme Court’s new term opens today, public attention will be focused on the furious and hypocritical effort of President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to ram through Judge Amy Coney Barrett as a replacement for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the voters remove both Trump and McConnell from power.

IN THIS EDITION:

  • USW 900 Worker Dies from Coronavirus Amid Outbreak at Rumford Mill
  • Over 80 Maine Union Members Signed Up for Strike School!
  • Waterville KVCAP Drivers Headed to a Union Election
  • Portland Museum of Art Workers Organizing Union
  • Want to Volunteer as a Paid Pollworker on Election Day? 

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka issued a strong warning to Donald Trump Friday that the nation’s workers are ready to stop any attempt by the administration to trash the U.S. constitution.

He was reacting to announcements by Trump that he considers the mail-in voting process unacceptable and that he will not commit to a peaceful transfer of power should he lose the election. Trump has said, essentially, that only an election he wins would be one he would recognize.

Members of the United Steelworkers (USW) at a steel factory in Columbus, Ohio, had hope when the Trump administration promised to protect their jobs. Fred Silvia, president of USW Local 9309, said: “Initially, we felt the tariffs were going to help us. Unfortunately, there was still steel coming in from overseas and our business just started dropping off.” Production at the steel factory where USW members worked was indefinitely halted in June. “The tariffs were a short-term fix to a long-term problem that we still currently have today.

This November, voters in Portland and Rockland will have the opportunity to vote on ballot measures to gradually increase the hourly minimum wage from $12 to $15 from 2022 to 2024. If approved, the two proposals would increase the minimum wages in Rockland and Portland from the current statewide $12 an hour level to $13 beginning Jan. 1, 2022, $14 in 2023, $15 in 2024 and then annual cost-of-living increases.