News

IN THIS EDITION:

  • Mainers Support Striking Massachusetts Nurses
  • Child Tax Credit Big Benefit for Working Families
  • New Laws Pass to Strengthen Democracy in Maine
  • UA Plumbers & Pipefitters 716 Leader Retires
  • Mark Your Calendars for Labor Day Events

IN THIS EDITION:

  • USW Local 27 Member Retires After 55 Years at the Baileyville Mill 
  • Consolidated Communications Workers Authorize Strike
  • Solidarity with Tenet Nurses On Strike in Massachusetts
  • New Unemployment Reform Law Is a Huge Win for Working Mainers
  • Labor Bills Become Law; Others Vetoed
  • Let Us Know About Any Workplace Struggles in Maine

Today’s energy infrastructure challenges are no less daunting. We must invest quickly and decisively to reduce emissions and stem climate change, and to improve our lagging competitiveness. New infrastructure must also deliver results on social equity, inequality, and systemic racism, 21st century crises whose solutions cannot be deferred.

IN THIS EDITION:

  • From Iraq to Maine: An Interview with USW 366 Unit President, Anaam Jabbir
  • Union Business Spotlight: Xtreme Screen Printing
  • Governor Mills’ Change Package Fully Funds Education and Revenue Sharing
  • Bill to Improve Unemployment System Clears Committee
  • Committee Passes Bill to Protect Whistleblowers
  • Maine AFL-CIO Gives Race & Labor Presentation to Legislative Committee

In 2020, Union Plus was able to give more than $2 million in hardship help to union members, plus some end-of-year gifts for extraordinary union members who were nominated by their communities. One hardship grant recipient was Beau Bittner. Bittner, a member of the UAW, worked on the line at an automaker factory in Louisville, Kentucky, performing torque inspections and ensuring the quality of big-name trucks and SUVs. He comes from a long line of union members and is heavily involved in his UAW local union.

AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler visited Mine Workers (UMWA) members yesterday in Brookwood, Alabama, who are striking against Warrior Met Coal in their fight for a fair contract. In addition to visiting the picket lines, Shuler spoke at a rally alongside UMWA International President Cecil Roberts and AFGE President Everett Kelly. The miners have been on strike since April 1 and don’t plan on slowing down until they reach their goals of fair pay and a safer workplace.

The American Jobs Plan is not threatened by America’s labor movement. It is strengthened by us and the inclusion of the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act.

Let’s clarify a few points. First, the PRO Act will not “force Americans” into anything. Instead, it will give workers the choice to form a union through a free and fair election. That’s not a power grab—just workplace democracy.

As the president of the Department for Professional Employees, AFL-CIO (DPE), I lead a coalition of 24 national unions representing more than four million professionals. Through bargaining for pay, benefits, and working conditions, our affiliates’ members have created sustainable, family-supporting careers in their industries. While these workplace improvements have raised standards for all professionals, employees of color tend to see some of the greatest gains from union membership.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) announcement last week that fully vaccinated people no longer have to wear masks or socially distance came as a great relief to millions of people who have been vaccinated. But it has also led to confusion and chaos in workplaces and other locations where vaccinated and unvaccinated people mix.

In a stark illustration of how current U.S. labor law is tilted against workers, two experts on changing it—AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler and Rep. Andy Levin, D-Mich., a former top union organizer—say the Protect The Right To Organize (Pro) Act would have basically outlawed Amazon’s high-pressure tactics that defeated the union organizing drive at its big warehouse in Bessemer, Ala.